FRUIT ENCYCLOPEDIA


HONEYCRISP APPLES

[huhn-ee] [krisp] [ap-uhl]

HONEYCRISP APPLES AVAILABILITY

Availble Fall-Winter-Spring Sadly, the perfect balance of sweet and tart that is a Honeycrisp, comes at a cost. These apples do not store well in the controlled atmosphere that is cold storage, so enjoy them while they last!

ABOUT HONEYCRISP APPLES

Honeycrisp Apples originated in Minnesota in the 1991. Their back story is not very interesting, and their origin is rather ordinary. That doesn’t mean that Honeycrisp Apples aren’t delicious though. Honeycrisp Apples pack the punch of a Honeygold with the crisp of a Macoun. As people started trying them they started growing in popularity. And for good reason; they are delicious! They are crisp and juicy, slightly tart but with the gentleness of sweet as well, they make for an excellent apple to eat raw.

HONEYCRISP APPLES TASTE & RIPENESS

Honeycrisp Apples are orange-red in appearance. They begin with orange striping over a yellow under color but are fully ripe when they are almost entirely red. The Honeycrisp’s delightful sweet and juicy flesh makes them a favorite among apple lovers.

RECIPES FEATURING HONEYCRISP APPLES

DOUBLE CELERY AND APPLE SOUP:

INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 stalks celery, with leaves
  • sliced 2 large yellow onions, peeled, trimmed and coarsely chopped
  • 2 sweet apples, peeled, cored and cubed
  • 1 pound celery root, peeled, trimmed and cubed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • Heavy cream or sour cream, for serving (optional)

DIRECTIONS:
  1. Melt the butter in a large Dutch oven or soup pot over low heat.
  2. Toss in the sliced celery, onions and apples, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft.
  3. Add the cubed celery root and turn it around in the butter.
  4. Toss the herbs into the pot, add the broth and bring to the boil.
  5. Lower the heat and cook at a gentle simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the celery root is soft enough to mash with the back of a spoon.
  6. If you can, pull out the bay leaf and what's left of the thyme.
  7. Working in small batches in a blender (first choice) or food processor, puree the soup until it's smooth. (If you're using a processor or an immersion blender,
    you might not get a super-smooth soup. If you'd like, you can run the pureed soup through a strainer, but it's really not necessary.)
  8. Taste for salt and pepper
  9. This needs to be served very hot (especially on a snowy day) and, while it really doesn't need an embellishment, like just about everything else in the world,
    it's better with cream, so either stir some into the pot or put a spoonful in the center of each bowl and let everyone swirl it into the soup.

Recipe courtesy Specialty Produce.