FRUIT ENCYCLOPEDIA


NAVEL ORANGES

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NAVEL ORANGES AVAILABILITY

Availble Spring-Winter

ABOUT NAVEL ORANGES

The Navel Orange originated from a single tree that was planted in Brazil in 1820. This tree had a mutation, causing two oranges to be produced within one single piece of fruit. The second orange, developing at the bottom of the fruit, opposite the stem, is where the Navel Orange gets its name, as that second orange vaguely resembles a human navel. The secondary orange is of vast importance, because it causes the orange to be seedless. Since these fruits lack seeds, farmers had to use techniques like cutting and grafting to continue producing the tree. As a result, every navel orange can be considered a product of that single tree planted over 200 years ago! The Navel Orange stands alone as the ultimate orange for eating out of hand. Neither overly tart, nor sweet, the Navel Orange produces outstanding orange juice, and can be easily segmented and shared with friends - that is, if you're willing to share.

NAVEL ORANGES TASTE & RIPENESS

Navel Oranges have a lack of seeds, easily-to-peel skin, and deliciously juicy flesh bursting with citrus flavor makes it a must have for any fruit lover. Oranges are one of those fruits that are at their best when they're ripened on the tree. The Fruit Company gets all of its citrus tree-ripened, to get it to you at its peak. Please feel free to peel and enjoy that orange as soon as it gets to you.

RECIPES FEATURING NAVEL ORANGES

ORANGE YOGURT PANNA COTTA:
Orange Yogurt Panna Cotta
INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin (a 1 1/4 oz envelope)
  • 2 cups whipping cream
  • 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise, or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 strips orange peel (about ½ inch wide an 2 to 3 inches long)
  • 1 2/3 cups plain yogurt
  • About 1/2 teaspoon salad oil

DIRECTIONS:
  1. In a small bowl, sprinkle gelatin over 1/4 cup cream. Gently mix and then let stand without stirring, until gelatin is soft, about 10 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, pour remaining 1 3/4 cups cream into a 1- to 2-quart pan over medium heat. Scrape seeds from vanilla bean into cream, then add the bean (if using vanilla extract, add after yogurt, below), sugar, and orange peel; stir until sugar is dissolved and mixture is simmering. Remove from heat. Add gelatin mixture and stir until gelatin is completely dissolved. Pour into a large bowl. Remove vanilla bean and orange peel and let cool 10 minutes. Add yogurt (and vanilla extract, if using) and stir until well blended.
  3. Lightly brush a 4-cup tube mold (or eight 1/2-cup molds) with oil; pour cream mixture into mold. Cover and chill until set, 8 hours or up to 2 days.
  4. Just before serving, unmold: Gently run a knife between panna cotta and sides of mold to loosen. Invert a plate over mold and, holding plate and mold together, turn over; lift off mold. If panna cotta doesn’t slip out easily, immerse mold to just below rim in warm water for about 2 seconds; lift out, dry bottom of mold, and repeat to invert onto plate.

Recipe courtesy myrecipes.com. View more images and information about this recipe at The Fruit Company's Blog.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT NAVEL ORANGES

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